Passion, Workaholism, Rhubarb, and Cowslips

Cover of "Meditations for Women Who Do To...

Cover of Meditations for Women Who Do Too Much

I like to have some philosophy and thoughts for me set out by the day of the month and thought some of you might like the same ones too, I’ve written about this book last month.

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Meditations for Women Who Do Too Much [me in other words..]

as written by Anne Wilson Schaef

March 29th

Passion

Many competent women have a difficult time distinguishing between passion and workaholism. When we hear the emerging concern about the lethal effects of compulsive working, we almost always ask ourselves (or justify to ourselves): ‘But what about being passionate with my work? Are you saying that to be passionate about my work is to be a workaholic? I don’t want to give up my work.’

Many of our role models for success are people who were willing to be devoured by their work. this is confusing to us.

True passion and doing what is important for us to do does not require us to destroy ourselves in the process. In fact, it is when passion gets distorted to compulsivity that it is destructive.

[Oh dear. this does sound like me at times]

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The Gardener’s Perpetual Almanack by Martin Hoyles – A Book of Days

March 29th

Oxslip or Great Cowslip is the flower for the day.

‘Rhubarb. This wholesome and agreeable vegetable has become so popular as a substitute for fruit in early spring that no garden should be without it.’

[I personally have some good roots but they are not yet ready for harvesting – they come much later in the year, but the rhubarb from the Yorkshire Triangle is available in the shops and is very sweet and tender and I’ve made some crumbles already with it]

‘Now ’tis the  spring, and weeds are shallow rooted;

Suffer them now and they’ll o’ergrow the garden,

And choke the herbs for want of husbandry’.

William Shakespeare Henry Vi part 2 1592

[Old William knew his gardening.. now is certainly the time to get those weeds out before they spread!]

A Primula veris, or cowslip, on Selsley common...

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