The Fairies are Faeries and Fae

I bought a set of ten Faery Realm novellas recently as something fairly light to read as the book club book was too depressing – but that’s another blog…

So here are some brief reviews of 10 books – some seriously as long as some novels and some just a few pages really with the idea for a longer story incorporated within the text if it could be extracted. Most of them come with 4 stars – and some are parts of series and some I have already bought and read the next book…

Book number 1 was by Rachel Morgan entitled The Faerie Guardian was about Creepy Hollow the place where guardians are trained to deal with nasties.

This is a YA with a kick-ass heroine – usually top of her training class in all areas including boxing and sword play, archery and martial arts who has serous ‘powers’. In this fairy story the fairies have very cool hair with streaks which match their eye colour, which is nice if your eyes are therefore blue, but not so good if your eyes are scarlet!

As with all teenagers there are some rebellious ones who like to flirt with danger and thus go to an ‘Underground’ club to dance and listen to the music. Not so bad you would think except that the Underground is where the seriously bad fairies live. And is definitely forbidden territory.

They have living plants above ground which for sure have a mind of their own. Especially Nigel the Vine.

Book 2: The Withering Palace by Alexia Purdy is about a ‘living’ palace and queendom (hardly a kingdom as never any kings only consorts) where the Queen is chosen by a duel with the previous Queen, usually her mother.  Another YA novel when it starts for sure but as the new Queen ages there is evidence that power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. The palace is also involved in this as it helps to choose who it considers to be the rightful queen and assists her in her duel and during her life.

Book 3: Dark Promise by Julia Crane and Talia Jager is the story of a changeling. This idea of fairies swapping human children for their own comes up and usually means something bad about the fairy child – they are evil or something. The human lives on without magic but in the stories about changelings we usually don’t hear much about them. In this story, as is traditional, the babies were swapped soon after birth. But we do find out what happened about the human child and we do find out that the fairy mother had a good reason. Though this doesn’t really endear her to her child overmuch and it takes a very long time for any sort of reconciliation to take place and then only because of some extreme circumstances.

Book 4: Feyland: 1st Adventure is by Anthea Sharp and is the prequel to the Feyland Trilogy – which I have read book 1 of already. Feyland is the computer based world that becomes reality when Jennet hacks in. A very dangerous world and of course a very precocious young heroine.

Not recommended reading if you have young gamers as I might just encourage them to find out just what they could hack into! They just might like this idea too much…

Book 5: Blood Faerie by India Drummond. I really liked this book – it is based in Scotland – which is a favoured location for other worldly beings and is a really good story that introduces a series. O confess to already having read book 2 and having bought Book 3 to savour later.

An elf who has been banished for her unusual grasp of magic teams up with a somewhat unusual Scottish policeman to solve crimes.

Druids and the isle of Skye also feature, as well as dark magic that uses blood – as if often the case – to strengthen it.

Book 6: Hood and Fae by Tara Maya is a refreshing re-telling of a favourite fairy story – with a ‘hood’ that is fashion conscious.

As I have said before a good funny kickass heroine really makes a book for me – if I need a bit of a lift and the really dark and psychologically challenging are just a bit too much to cope with…

Book 7: Dark Fae  by the prolific Terry Spears  is another YA book. With a number of questions that arise. Who is the mystery girl? And who were her parents? And were they Royal? And is this a ‘take’ on Cinderella? Kidnap or worse?

Fae politics are very complicated indeed.

Book 8: Ehriad  by Jenna Elizabeth Johnson is about a monster hunting bounty hunter – looking for creatures from the ‘otherworld’. Portals in various odd places permit movement from one world to another.

In this story The Morrigan is the Celtic goddess of War and Strive.

Book 9: Once: A gypsy story by Dana Michelle Burnett – not really my cup of tea this one with gypsies and I skipped over very fast. Fog and Grandmothers and superstitions’.

Book 10: Fae Horse is a very short story by Anthea Sharp  is about  the nasty Night Mare – the horse that gives us bad dreams and if you encounter her – don’t ride her!

 

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